Sunday, September 16, 2012

Foil Characters

Author's Use of Character Foil
A foil, or foil character, is a character in a story that acts in a drastically different way than the main protagonist in order to show the strong differences between the characters. The term comes from jewelers, who would use dull bases and stands to make shiny gems appear shinier.  In a highly structured paragraph, explain how Morrison uses character foils to illuminate specific traits in one of the main characters.  Do not forget to respond to at least two of your peers' responses.

68 comments:

  1. Morrison uses Maureen and Pecola as foil characters. Morrison does this by clearly stating the obvious as Maureen storms out saying "I am cute" (Morrison) and although Pecola does not understand that she is ugly, it is obvious that everyone surrounding her thinks Pecola is not the emphasised "media beauty". The author often uses Maureen, and Pecola side by side to enforce the fact Maureen is happy, and outgoing, while Pecola "hide's behind her ugliness"(Morrison). Pecola, and Maureen are two different types of social classes, and they use eachother to illuminate one-another's flaws when they are side by side. Everyone adores Maureen, as Pecola is looked down upon and hated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Within you explanation you mentioned that "Pecola and Maureen are two different types of social classes, and they use eachother to illuminate one another's flaws...". While I agree with your statement in terms of Maureen illuminating Pecola's flaws, how would Pecola illuminate Maureen's flaws?

      Delete
    2. I think that Pecola illuminates Maureen's flaws just that encounter they had when they did get into a verbal argument. The fact the Maureen flaw of being pretty on the outside, but still being ugly in the side. The fact they are both willing to look "un-lady like behavior in public would suffice as Pecola bring out one of Maureen's flaws.

      Delete
    3. Yes, Adrea. I would have to say that Pecola brings out that side of Maureen, which is not directly shown to readers by the author herself. Through that verbal argument, (which would have to be indirect characterization) readers can see that Maureen is prideful about her "cute" quality because she deliberately screamed, "I am cute! And you ugly!" to Pecola whose self-esteem level is already well below the negative scale.

      Delete
    4. I think that Pecola does understand that she is ugly. She can see that there is other people more beautiful. This is how she can tell that other people see her as ugly and not beautiful. I agree with Diana when she mentions how Maureen is prideful, and can even be seen as confident she can say she is cute, and she can call Pecola ugly because she knows that no one can tell her otherwise.

      Delete
    5. Yes, as their only encounter is the one that brings out the real flaws in Maureen not the ones Frieda and Claudia tried so hard to find and eventually found. As well as reinforcing Pecolas low selfesteem and how much Maureen is concieded.

      Delete
  2. Throughout the novel Morrison uses many foil characters to highlight the protagonist, Pecola. Dick and Jane, Shirley Temple, Mary Jane, Maureen Peal, all of these different characters are portrayed in Pecola in different aspects of her life. The use of Mary Jane was the most effective to me though, because not only could the reader see the mental love for blue-eyes, it was also illustrated physically. The "nine lovely orgasms" that came from "Mary Jane for which the candy was named" showed a glimpse of Pecola becoming the exact thing she dreams of being, even if it was only temporary. Morrison uses this character foil, to show Pecola's involuntary need to be white, have blue-eyes, to be beautiful. How even though she was just so angry at the Jew candy store owner for judging her on being something she couldn't control, she couldn't physically be mad because she knew relief was going to come from the 9 candies, with 9 pairs of mischievous blue-eyes waiting to bring her happiness.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, but you forgot to point out her ugliness that she and her family hold. Due to this with those nine candies she becomes something not ugly but something beautiful.

      Delete
    2. I believe she did point that out. I'm sure she ment that when she explained how the candy store owner "judged her on something she couldn't control".

      Delete
    3. I understand why Miguel actually felt the need to clarify. Remember in class, I encouraged you all to stop using the word "things." It breeds ambiguity. The reader should never have to make the connection his/herself. The writer alone bears this responsibility.

      Delete
  3. Morrison uses character foils to illuminate specific traits in the protagonist Pecola, by exposing things she wishes for that she unfortunately doesn't have. Such as Pecola's admiration for Shirley Temple can expose that she perhaps longs to be as cute and loved as Shirley. Since in the novel Pecola and her family are described as ugly that's perhaps why she looks up so much to Shirley because she longs to be more like her in the aspects of being beautiful and liked. It can be a connection of how Pecola wasn't loved and Shirley Temple was a well-known young girl who was loved and adored by many, something Pecola sadly lacked. In reality, Pecola was treated very cruelly and perhaps in admiring Shirley she hoped to become like her. Mirroring her actions or how she looked perhaps would spark some sense of beauty or love in Pecola's heart.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As well as Mary Jane. Mary Jane had those blue eyes that see so much wanted. Thus eating those candies to get away from everything. In return the candy made her feel beautiful and loved for that short amount of time. Knowing that candy does not last forever.

      Delete
    2. I really like your response to the blogpost Arlene, and I couldn't agree more. After reading your response (as well as Miguel's comment on it) the thought that came to my mind was that through Pecola's interactions with the Shirley Temple cup and the Mary Jane candy, she stops feeling lonely. Perhaps Pecola's ugliness is her loneliness, when she is no longer lonely, she is no longer ugly, which is why she so desperately craves these interactions with Shirley Temple and Mary Jane.

      Delete
    3. Wow, I loved your comment Vanessa. I like how you thought of how Pecola uses Shirley Temple and Mary Jane candy to get away from her loneliness and her ugliness! I never thought of it like that, but I couldn't agree more! And I agree with you also Miguel, Mary Jane is another very big part of Pecola! And we can relate it back to Vanessa's thought of how those two things make Pecola forget about her troubles, even if its only for a short period of time.

      Delete
    4. My heart just melted reading this thread.

      Delete
    5. You make a point; through Pecola’s admiration of Shirley she seems to feels as if there is hope she too will be loved and adored. Pecola believes that by becoming beautiful like Shirley it will assure her a different lifestyle from the one she is facing.

      Delete
    6. I totally agree with your reason on why she spent so much time with the Shirley Temple cup, because I originally concluded that it was just because she had blue eyes. Because her idea of beauty was blue eyes, I didn't think to look into the fact that Shirley Temple was loved in a way she wasn't. But in your last sentence you say that "Mirroring her actions or how she looked perhaps would spark some sense of beauty or love in Pecola's heart." Im not sure, but I don't remember Pecola ever actually trying to change her actions or looks to become beautiful. All the interactions that Morrison describe all mentally happen for Pecola. She drinks all that milk, not because she was thirsty, but to spend time with the Shirley Temple cup. Even her "nine lovely orgasms" were brought on by her envisioning in her mind "becoming Mary Jane." On the aspect of her looks, she is obviously surrounded by some gargoyle friends who could help her out in that department, but Pecola has already resigned herself to deal with that ugliness that her and her family share. She only allows herself those moments to (feel) beautiful.

      Delete
  4. Morrison uses Frieda to illuminate specific character traits in her younger sister, Claudia. Frieda, as the older sister, is more experienced than Claudia, accentuating her younger sister's naivety and lack of knowledge about things such as Pecola's period. However, although more experienced, Frieda is clearly not as wise and realistic as Claudia. For example, while Frieda and Pecola fawn over Shirley Temple's cute appearance, Claudia is thinking on a much deeper level. Claudia, even at her young age, expressed ideas of race, archetypes, and societal folly while Frieda sat googly-eyed at a cup. Frieda's ignorance clearly emphasizes Claudia's maturity and higher level thinking, while likewise emphasizing her ignorance of many aspects of the real world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with your choices of Foil characters even though I never thought of them as foil characters before this post. Your support really made it easy to understand how the are foil characters. Well done!

      Delete
  5. Throughout the novel, "The Bluest Eye," by Toni Morrison, the author uses numerous foil characters to highlight specific traits and characteristics. The foil characters which Morrison used in order to emphasize Claudia's traits where Pecola and Frieda. Claudia exists as the leader of the group despite her young age and once Claudia is placed next to Frieda and Pecola, both of whom aren't as mentally adept as her, it becomes evident as to why she is the leader. Claudia exists on a higher level when comparing her to the other young girls—she is smarter and seems to see the world in a more mature view.
    Furthermore, within the prologue the same paragraph is repeated three times. Each paragraph represents one of the three girls, the first one being highly structured (Claudia), the second being filled with slight errors (Frieda), and the third one being completely incomprehensible (Pecola). Through these differences the reader is able to see Claudia for the intellectually advanced young girl she is. Claudia’s preferences are also emphasized when compared to that of Pecola and Frieda. Claudia’s hate towards Shirley Temple seems more intense when compared to the undying love her two companions share for the young child star--when in reality it would not seem too grandiose if the two hadn't shown such idolization.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do agree with you Emilia.Claudia does seem more intellectually adept than the other two girls besides her "inexperience" that she constantly reminds the reader of.And even though Frieda and Pecola are both older, Claudia is the one portrayed as the more mature of them both through meticulous thoughts that she presents in her dialogue with Frieda and through her outstanding vocabulary.

      Delete
    2. I notice that many of you are impressed with Claudia's vocabulary. Why is her vocabulary impressive? Please consider the point of view.

      Delete
    3. Esperanza ElizarrarazSeptember 19, 2012 at 10:09 PM

      Oh wow, I never thought about the prologue representing the three girls like that. But when I think about it after reading this, it makes sense how you would come up with an observation like this. And I do agree with you Emilia, Claudia is alot more advanced in her thoughts than Pecola and Frieda, so I do agree they serve as foil characters to each other.

      Delete
  6. Within the novel, "The Bluest Eye," by Toni Morrison, Morrison's character Pecola, who happens to be a foil character, can be displayed as dimwitted. While Claudia is somewhat smart she constantly refers back to Pecolas life and her sister Friedas, due to their own personalty that differs from Claudia herself. Pecola can be viewed as the silent nobody that she herself trys to be but with conflicts like blue eyes for instants, she herself wants to become a beautiful child with blue eyes. This becomes heavily focused with toward Claudia's perspective. Thus indicating that maybe Claudia too wants blue eyes so she can be viewed differently as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While I agree with you when you say Pecola yearns for blue eyes and to become beautiful and accepted, I'm not sure I follow you when you begin to speak of Claudia wanting blue eyes as well. Does Claudia's intense hatred towards the 'Blue eyes' exist as your reasoning for that--maybe a denial situation of sorts, or were you taking a different approach?

      Delete
    2. I agree with Emilia.Are you trying to assert that the magnification of Pecola's yearning for blue eyes implies that Claudia too wants blue eyes?Or is there another reasoning behind your logic?

      Delete
    3. Well I'm simply trying to say that the section is heavily focused on Blue Eyes and yet the title its self is The Bluest Eyes. Further more I said 'maybe, theirs a reason why Claudia talks about blue eyes in this story. I'm just trying to conclude if she wants them as well ,but not as much as Pecola, or she sees them as a form of beauty.

      Delete
    4. I believe he wants to assert the point that Pecola in fact wants blue eyes because she wants to be seen as someone completely different and would probably want the blue eyes thinking that it would change her reality.

      Delete
    5. I think I will have to disagree with you Miguel. She seems to agressively attach, combat, and belittle people who conform to the ideologies and philosophies of the dominate culture, in this case White Elitists.

      Delete
    6. I think that if Claudia were to somehow get blue eyes then she would rip them out of eye socket with her bare hands. As I read the story it seems that she despises those blue eyes and everyone affiliated with them
      -Jesus Alcantar

      Delete
  7. When I first saw the Morrison's use of foil characters to contrast from the protagonist. For instance when Morrison writes the description of the house and the family living in the prologue she uses three of that characters point of view. The protagonist of the story being Pecola and having her be the worst writer out of three makes a contrast to the reader of how the foil character's background. One of the difference you notice for the prologue is the grammar and punctuation from the three girls, making the reader think of how they tree had different lives. For example it seemed like Pecola had less education then Claudia and Frieda.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, through the dialogue Morrison aims to show how each of the girls education, and background was different for each others. Perhaps she does so to how their lives were such as when she describes Pecola's home, you get the sense that Pecola wasn't as fortuante as per say Maureen. Maybe another reason why she was teased, she wasn't like everyone else.

      Delete
    2. Andrea, you are correct; the prologue establishes that the three girls are Morrison's character foils. However, please explain the significance of the three girls' relationship to each other and the plot? Additionally, consider identifying the trait that the author illuminates?

      Delete
  8. In the Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison uses the character Maureen Peal as the foil character to Pecola Breedlove to farther draw attention to and emphasize Pecola’s characteristics. Morrison already averted reader’s attention to Pecola’s appearance as well as her family’s in Chapter 3 of the story. In examining the appearance of Pecola, which also included her family, Morrison says “[t]he master had said, ‘You are ugly people.’ And they looked about themselves and saw nothing to contradict the statement.” That being said, with Maureen in thrown into the storyline, this particular characteristic of Pecola’s has been accentuated, making readers see Pecola as someone who isn’t anticipated as Maureen is presented in the story. By emphasizing Pecola’s “ugly” characteristic, readers see how lowly she thinks of herself. This lowliness does not refer to modesty or humbleness in any way. It refers to her self-esteem and the lack of openmindedness in her own world. This creates an effect upon the reader making them pity Pecola. It also makes the reader see that she carries a heavy sadness within her which no one can help her with.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The description that is given of Maureen is that of a girl who is... perfect. I had never really understood why a girl as "ugly" as Pecola would even care to associate with a girl of Maureen's stature. Now that I've read your response to the blogpost, I can see that Morrison had a purpose of having the two girls interact with each other.

      Delete
    2. Nice observation Diana. I never looked at it like that. On a different note, I saw the description of Maureen as means of revealing prejudices and ignorances on the part of the reader. From my experience, people typically appear astonished to find that Maureen is Black, which naturally breeds ignorant epithets explaining their rationale as to why they cannot believe she is Black. Interestling, the epithets seem to stem from foolish sterotypes.

      Delete
    3. That's awesome, Vanessa!

      I feel as if I should further explain, however.

      Because Pecola has never been exposed to anything other than knowing she's "ugly," (such as in school when the boys surrounded her and when she went to buy those Mary Janes at the store) with Maureen by her side, it only highlights her lack of self-esteem, the fact that she doesn't believe she too COULD be admirable. But as the aforementioned about her and her family, she actually EMBRACED being "ugly." Her and her whole entire family. As mentioned in the text, "it came from conviction, their conviction" (which means their opinion, their BELIEF) that made them "ugly," therefore, everyone else saw them as "ugly" too.

      Maureen, on the other hand, believes she is cute, hence her rubbing it in the faces of Pecola, Frieda, and Claudia after their little dispute. Because of this, she IS "cute," she IS admirable, well liked by everyone else.

      Maureen's part in the story is this: If only Pecola could change her mindset about herself, be more open-minded and stop "hiding behind" her "ugliness" as mentioned in the text, she too could be well liked.

      Delete
    4. Yes, Mr. Rogers. I assumed too that Maureen might have been white, only because in the text, it stated that "[s]he was rich." Because of that, I related "rich" to well-to-do families which, therefore, are mostly white families, white people. But of course, I was contradicted and that is a stereotype.

      Delete
    5. I agree Maureen's purpose is to enhance Pecola's ugly appearance. This enhancement really strikes the readers pathos causing them to relate to Pecola maybe not in the sense of feeling ugly, but in that everyone at some point has been envious of someone else's appearance.

      Delete
  9. It is interesting to observe,that as subtle as it may be,Mary Jane is set as a foil character to Pecola.Unlike Pecola,Mary Jane has beautiful blue eyes and it seems that Pecola longs for what she has.Mary Jane demonstrates the horrible life that Pecola has,since Pecola is desperately trying to become one with Mary Jane.As if their relationship went deeper than a young girl's admiration for the beautiful girl on a candy wrapper.This is demonstrated through the "orgasms" that Pecola has when she eats the candy.Not only does she have one,she has several,nine to be exact.When a person orgasms it is during the sexual act of being with a significant other. They become intertwined,as if they were only one person rather than two.They share everything!Just like that, Pecola wants to share everything with Mary Jane as if they were only one person. She wants Mary Jane's life which serves to demonstrate the before mentioned;Pecola's horrible life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well said Vanessa you make good points. I thought of the Mary Jane's more of the closest thing Pecola can obtain to that of the blue eyes. As well as the orgasms coming from the idea of that she has obtained and comsumed a candy that illustrates her physical desires.

      Delete
  10. In the novel “The Bluest Eye”, Morrison’s use a foil characters illuminates specific traits in characters. An example of the illumination through foil characters would be of one of the main characters in the novel, Mrs.Breedlove. Mrs.Breedlove is classified as some sort of “martyr” in the novel, yet she also has this contrasting misanthropic vibe to her character. The character that acts as a foil to Mrs.Breedlove would be Miss Marie, the prostitute who fabricates stories. Miss Marie seems to have a maternal instinct when it comes to her interactions with Pecola, one that is absent in the relationship between Pecola and Mrs.Breedlove. Miss Marie asks Pecola where her socks are, yet Mrs.Breedlove doesn’t even care that her daughter left the house without socks. Miss Marie takes the time to tell Pecola stories, and Mrs.Breedlove doesn’t even take the time to talk to her daughter. The differences between Miss Marie and Mrs.Breedlove are extreme. The purpose for these extremities is to pose the idea that family is not defined by blood, that Miss Marie's and the prostitutes become some sort of dysfunctional family to Pecola.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree that Pecola's blood family and whore family are definitely contrasting in their conventionality and behavior among each other. I believe this contrast further emphasizes the disfunctionality of Pecola's blood family and entire life, really. What preadolescent girl's family is so painful to be a part of that she actually finds MORE refuge in a house of prostitutes?

      Delete
    2. That's a great interpretation, Vanessa! I would have seen only just how different the two are in "maternal instinct" but not family wise.

      Delete
  11. In the "Bluest Eye", Tony Morrison uses Miss Marie as a foil character to Mrs.Breedlove to emphasize how Pecola's relationship with her mother is far from ordinary. Mrs.Breedlove is Pecola's biological mother but she acts nothing like a mother to Pecola,showing no affection what so ever.Unlike Mr. Breedlove, Miss Marie acts more like a mother figure to Pecola. Miss Marie questions why Pecola doesnt have any socks on and is concerned about Pecola's well-being.The sad reality is Pecola learns more from a prostitute then her mother and is shown more affection by her.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True, that is exactly what I was thinking about the two. And how one of them acts more of a mother figure than the other, even though it has to be a whore that greater influences Pecola.
      -Jesus Alcantar

      Delete
    2. I agree with you Jose. Mrs.Breedlove does not act like Pecola is her flesh and blood but as if she is someone extra in her life that she does not want but have to keep. By Pecola seeking for a mother figure in Miss Marie is to me, a better choice even if she is a prostitutes because as you stated Miss Marie is "concerned about Pecola's well-beings" than her own mother. It is sad to me to think that there are parents like Mrs.Breedlove out there treating their child(rens) like nothing.

      Delete
  12. It is cleary evident that the character of Maureen is a foil character to that of Pecola. The connection between the two characters can be seen when the ugliness of pecola and her family and Maureen's cuteness. Pecola is has a dark complexion while that of Maureens it the total opposite with her fair skin. Even though both girls share the same ethnicity Maureen's character is accepted more in society then that of Pecola's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Despite their appearance are they opposite in any other ways?

      Delete
    2. Great question Jose! Please both of you answer this question.

      Delete
    3. One way they are opposite is that Maureen what Pecola desperately wants. While not particularly blue, Maureen has the "pretty eyes" that people do not do bad things in front of, as demonstrated when Maureen's gaze alone stopped the boys from picking on Pecola. Those are the eyes that Pecola believes so strongly will save her from her painful home life.

      Delete
  13. Morrison uses the character of Maureen Peal as a foil character for Pecola to illustrate specific traits that reveal her personality. Claudia characterizes Maureen as “the richest of the white girls”. She goes on to describing her green eyes as well as the friendly reactions from everyone who surrounds her, including the “black boys [who] didn’t trip her in the halls” (Morrison). Through this description the reader can acknowledge how Pecola is completely different from Maureen. Pecola’s troubled life from her family to her physical appearance is highlighted as it is compared to Maureen’s perfect world. The reader recognizes how frustrating Pecola’s life is with an alcoholic parent and the abusive environment she faces with her parents.

    ReplyDelete
  14. In "The Bluest Eyes" Toni Morrison uses Maureen to illuminate specific traits in Pecola. In the novel, Pecola is seen as "ugly" and the kids use her as an insult. It is evident that she doesn't receive respect even though she is respectful of others. On the other hand, Maureen is respected and adored. Unlike Pecola, she is very outspoken and isn't afraid to put herself out there. The use of foil characters in this situation leads the reader to contemplate the reasons why Pecola and Maureen are treated so differently. Without this contrast the readers wouldn't have an insight to how Pecola's personality really is.

    ReplyDelete
  15. In the novel "The Bluest Eye", Morrison uses Pecola and Maureen as foil characters. Since Pecola is considered ugly in the novel it is Maureen who by comparison changes the "thought" of Pecolas looks. Since Pecola knows Maureens looks appear to be flawless she seeks for flaws in order to feel better about her looks, and to know that Maureen in fact is not flawless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would say that i agree with you Gaby. Maureen is this supposedly cute girl and Pecola is this ugly girl. So seeing them as foil characteristics self explanatory. I like when you said that Pecola just wants to feel better about her looks

      Delete
  16. Throughout the story Claudia seems to foil Pecola. While Pecola is the oldest and should be the leader of the group she's actually the awkward one who doesn't know what is happening most of the time. Whereas Claudia is the complete opposite she seems to be exceptionally knowledgable for her age and looks after Pecola as if she was her little sister which is ironic since Pecola is older.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Throughout the novel, Morrison uses different opportunities to reveal to the reader foil characters. In the “Bluest Eye”, Morrison uses Miss. Marie and Mrs. Breedlove as foil characters. It is interesting to view the two because Mrs. Breedlove is this Christian woman while Miss. Marie is a prostitute. I find it ironic that Miss. Marie is this prostitute but yet is seen as a mother figure to Pecola. It goes to show how any type of love can become the love of a mother, whether it is from a prostitute or not. It is also interesting to know that Miss. Marie doesn’t cuss because she still has morals. Yes, she may be a prostitute, and yes she may be frowned upon in society but she shows Pecola love and that is all Pecola can ask for. Mrs. Breedlove is a mother, she disciplines and at times comforts, but there is not that love Pecola is looking for. In a way there will never be that love from Mrs. Breedlove Pecola is thirsting for, so she tries to locate it in Miss. Marie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Esperanza ElizarrarazSeptember 19, 2012 at 10:16 PM

      I completely agree that Miss Marie and Mrs. Breedlove are foil characters. And I do agree on what you said that even though Mrs. Breedlove is Pecola's mom, she looks up to Miss Marie more , asking her questions, and looks at her like a mother figure. This in itself is very ironic. And the point that Miss Marie is a prostitute but yet still has morals, and chooses not to cuss is also too very ironic. But I think that in a way this helps humanize Miss Marie and it gets away from the idea that she is a prostitute so we can see that just because she is involved in prostituting herself she is still a good person.

      Delete
    2. I like how you compared the two mother figures and how you referred to Mrs. Breedlove as a "christian" woman. Would she really be considered a christian woman? If she isnt, would it affect how she is viewed next to Miss Marie?

      Delete
    3. This is quite the fantastic comparison. I definitely find myself agreeing with your points and the irony is quite clear once you laid it out. Although small, another contrasting feature between the two is their given title of Mrs. and Miss which strengthens your argument about the irony of Miss Marie appearing as a stronger mother figure. The title of Mrs. is associated with being married, more knowledgeable, more responsible, and what not but rather, the character who holds the title of Miss seems to be more dominant in these features. Your comparison makes me wonder about what could occur if Mrs. Breedlove and Miss Marie meet each other. You did a wonderful job Brianna.

      Delete
  18. Throughout the novel I see that the foil characters that stand out to me the most would be the girl with blue eyes and blonde hair and Pecola. Any girl with blue eyes and blonde hair would contrast what Pecola wants to be. Pecola thinks that if she ever is able to have blonde hair and blue eyes then she would be pretty, and that everything would be alright in her life.
    -Jesus Alcantar

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your explanation is rather broad and I think it would be better if you scaled it down to a comparison between Pecola and one or two particular females that prominently features blonde hair and blue eyes (e.g. Shirley Temple, Hedy Lamarr, etc.). That way, your answer will be more concise and perhaps you would be able to provide a more expansive comparison.

      Delete
  19. Esperanza ElizarrarazSeptember 19, 2012 at 10:22 PM

    For me throughout the novel, the observation of foil characters was visible and to me the most dramatic one was that of Claudia and Pecola. They served as a great example of foil characters. Pecola is very quiet while Claudia is more outspoken and so she takes on the role of the leader of the three girls. And it is ironic how even though Claudia is younger than Pecola, she is much more knowledgeable and advanced in her thoughts, while Pecola is naive and doesn't really know too much. Things like these, and how they were both compared to each other, just served to highlight their differences and so I saw them as a good example of foil characters.

    ReplyDelete
  20. As the novel progresses, Morrison introduces the character Maureen Peal, a foil to Pecola. Maureen represents the very type of person that Pecola is not: the white girl that everybody adores. Maureen is considered wealthy, has nice clothes, and nearly everybody idolizes her, while Pecola is poor and mostly everyone reveals contempt toward her. An alarming aspect of Maureen that defines her foil to Pecola is her wretchedness. Maureen momentarily befirends Pecola, only to spite her within, what seems, less than hour. By revealing Maureen's malice, the reader observes Pecola's inner beauty and has an understanding of the torment Pecola must cope with, and her desire to become her tormentor.

    ReplyDelete
  21. In the novel "The Bluest Eye", Toni Morrison's use of foil characters highlights specific traits within the main character Claudia. By placing Frieda side by side with Claudia, Morrison exposes the contradiction between the two. When Claudia argues "I'm tired of Frieda knowing everything" (Morrison), it reveals Claudia's naive character and her inability to comprehend the "surface" of the world whereas her sister, Frieda is more experience which allows her to comprehend this "surface" outlook. Ironically, Claudia is able to perceive the world in a deeper level of thinking although she is younger than Frieda. Without one or the other, the readers are unable to identify whether the sister's perspective are narrow, naive, or comprehensible. Thus, it demonstrates that these two sisters highlights each others traits.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Within the novel, Toni Morrison's masterfully fleshes out the characters by foiling them off one another. It is clear that there are more than one foil relationship; one in particular is the relationship between Pecola and Miss Marie. The two of them have several differences and one of these differences is the level, or maybe more appropriately, the variation, of knowledge each character possesses. Whereas Pecola appears as a naive, curious youth with much to learn of the world, Miss Marie is a seasoned veteran of life with much knowledge to offer. Where Pecola is, arguably, a bit reserved and not one that would garner much attention, Miss Marie is boisterous and stands out like a house hogtied with Christmas lights in the dead of a dark night. One key factor in this foil relationship is that the dynamics between the two of them is so uncanny. They work off of each other so well that it creates a fun, bright atmosphere in a narrative that is oftentimes rather gloomy.

    ReplyDelete
  23. In the story “The Bluest Eye” by Toni Morrison, the author uses foil to set Claudia and Frieda apart. Claudia rejects the beauty that society deems to be the "IT" look while Frieda accepts them. For example, when Frieda and Pecola was talking about “how cuute Shirley Temple” (Morrison) was, Claudia was not interested in the topic as much as the other girls. Frieda and Pecola are older than Claudia but they both are stuck on to be considered to be “pretty” by others, they must have blonde hair, blue eyes, and white skins. As a nine years old, with Claudia’s beliefs of the beauty amazes the readers because kids her age would think more of how society is thinking as opposed to having an intellectual view on appearance.

    ReplyDelete